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Cara Haynes

Contributing Writer
Education: BA English, Brigham Young University

Cara Haynes has been writing and editing about internet service and TV for six years. Previous to contributing to Helpful, she worked on HighSpeedInternet.com and SatelliteInternet.com. She graduated with a BA in English and a minor in editing from Brigham Young University. She believes no one should feel lost in internet land and that a good internet connection significantly extends your lifespan.

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Everyone is cutting the cord these days (AKA choosing video streaming services and ditching their cable or satelite TV provider). For the first time in history, streaming will drive more viewing time for people than cable TV. (1)
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Relying on your internet connection to work from home is on a whole different level than just relying on your internet to watch your nightly Netflix episode. You need a connection that you can trust completely. The spinning wheel of doom becomes a much more serious issue when it’s preventing you from participating in an important meeting or downloading the file that you need to meet that deadline.
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Password sharing with streaming services is almost as pervasive as the streaming services themselves. A recent survey by Leichtman Research reported that 33% of Netflix users share passwords outside of their household (and that’s just those who admitted it). (1) Streaming providers suspect the problem is even more widespread than they realize. (2) But it’s a problem that streaming services—and their customers—have mixed feelings about.
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RV internet can unlock some pretty cool things for you: working from a national park, streaming Netflix out in the boondocks, or even just posting your latest adventures on social media are all possible when you have solid RV Wi-Fi that works where you need it to. But how hard is it to actually get RV internet?
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A low-Earth orbit satellite (sometimes abbreviated to LEO satellite) is a satellite that travels in orbit 1,200 miles above the Earth or less. Although low-Earth orbit satellites have been in use since 1957—beginning with the launch of low-Earth orbit Sputnik and progressing to the International Space Station—they have only recently been employed for satellite internet service, thanks to advanced technology from SpaceX. (1) Previously only geostationary satellites (larger satellites that orbit 22,000 miles above Earth) were used to provide satellite internet service, which is created by satellites beaming an internet signal from space. Geostationary satellites provide nationwide coverage but offer slow speeds and expensive data. Using low-Earth orbit satellites for internet services not only reduces latency, but also opens the floodgates for faster satellite internet speeds and unlimited data. In this article, we’ll cover what the use of low-Earth orbit satellites means for satellite internet service and how they bring faster speeds and lower latency. We’ll also cover the risk of relying on low-Earth orbit satellites and why geostationary satellites are still here to stay.
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Although most of the world uses the internet every day, not many people take the time to understand how it all works. But getting your bearings when it comes to internet basics is a good first step toward making smarter decisions online.
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Reliable internet for travel is a must-have that you don’t want to leave home without. The last thing you want when you’re traveling abroad is to be lost wandering the streets of Rome at nightfall without access to Google Maps—will you really remember how to ask for directions in Italian? Probably not.
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DSL internet is cheaper than satellite internet and gives you a lot more data for the money. Satellite internet also has higher latency, which means you’ll be waiting milliseconds longer for pages to load. That will put you at a disadvantage for things like online gaming and Black Friday shopping.
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Fiber is faster and more reliable than cable, but cable is much more available and usually cheaper than fiber. Fiber is the clear winner when it comes to speed and performance, but its limited availability makes it off limits for most folks. That said, fiber and cable are the two best internet types out there, so really you’ll be happy with either—as long as you get
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When it comes to TV and entertainment streaming, there are two main ways to watch: on-demand and live. The difference between on-demand and live TV streaming is that on-demand content is available whenever you want it, while live TV streaming follows a program (similar to traditional TV programming). You have to be available to watch a program when it airs or use a DVR to record it if you want to watch later.
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Satellite and fixed wireless are both internet types that use radio waves to transmit data. However, the different technology used results in different speeds, latency, cost, and plans available.
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A VPN (virtual private network) is a service that encrypts all your internet traffic via a remote server from a third-party company. A VPN will hide your
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The decision to self-install your internet or pay for a professional to do it is tough. Your internet service provider promises self-installation will be a quick and painless experience if you just use their app—but is that too good to be true?
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Making the jump from cable to streaming TV is a choice a lot of people are making these days: every major cable TV provider reported more customers cutting the cord than ever before. (1)