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The best TV providers of 2023


Headshot of Kathryn Casna
Rebecca Palmer smiles for the camera
Researched by
Headshot of Vilja Johnson
Headshot of Bri Field
Reviewed by
Updated 2/2/23

Our approach
18 brands reviewed
5 TV experts
600+ customer reviews

From reliability and premium channels to DVRs and live TV streaming options, we have you covered. Our expert reviewers focused on not just price, but every element of the TV-watching experience. The top TV provider of 2023 is DISH, a satellite provider with wide availability, a two-year price lock, and the most shows and games in 4K.

Top TV providers in the US

Editor's choice
DISH
DISH
Staff rating
4.0
Customer rating
3.9
  • Plans starting at $56.99 - $137.99
  • 330+ channels
  • 125-500 DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply. For offer details, view disclaimers

Runner-up
Optimum
Optimum brand
Staff rating
4.0
Customer rating
3.7
  • Plans starting at $2.15 - $195.00
  • 420+ channels
  • 150 DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply. For offer details, view disclaimers

Runner-up
Verizon Fios
Verizon Fios brand
Staff rating
4.2
Customer rating
4.3
  • Plans starting at $49.99 - $110.00
  • 425+ channels
  • 50+ DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply.

Runner-up
Xfinity
Xfinity brand
Staff rating
3.8
Customer rating
4.2
  • Plans starting at $19.99 - $299.95
  • 10+ channels
  • 20+ DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply. For offer details, visit the provider's website.

How we ranked each TV provider

We asked, and you answered: people don’t choose TV providers based on brand names; they choose based on shows they love and games they can’t miss! With that in mind, we looked at package costs for the top live TV providers compared to what you really get, and we took careful notes of any extra fees that might come up. We looked at the entire entertainment experience so you have all the info you need and the context to make sense of it all.


  • Value
    We looked at pricing, total channel availability, and the popularity of those channels to compare the best TV packages and bundling options from each of our top TV providers.
  • Features
    A great TV provider helps you watch what you want, on your schedule. We sized up DVRs, remote functionality, and streaming apps and compared them head to head.
  • Equipment and installation
    You need to know how much it costs to sign up with a new provider, how long it takes, how much you’ll pay, and how reliable the service will be. We got you.
  • Sports and premium channels
    We compared how easy it is to find regional and national games, which leagues are available, and how much you’ll pay for premium movie channels.

Top TV providers in the US in 2023

#1 DISH: Oodles of sports and entertainment in 4K, with a 3-year price lock

DISH is our top TV provider in the US for its widespread availability, its straightforward pricing, and its huge selection of channels for sports, entertainment, news, and education. It offers more games and shows in 4K than the competition, and its DVR tech makes for a uniquely satisfying TV viewing experience.

You can’t get every single NFL game like you can with NFL SUNDAY TICKET (currently only available from competitor DIRECTV) and there are no regional sports networks, but you can catch hundreds of games with league coverage of NFL, NBA, and MLB, plus college games galore. You also get access to a wide variety of movies and shows, and the most popular premium channels are free for the first few months. It all comes with the sweet DISH Anywhere mobile app and a three-year price lock, and we’re not mad about it.

DISH doesn't offer its own internet service, unlike many of the services we reviewed, but it partners with providers across the country. A list of internet types and providers offering bundle pricing is available on the DISH corporate site.

There are some downsides to be aware of with DISH—and they are real reasons to hit pause on your purchase. First, there are hefty cancellation fees, up to $10 per month for every month remaining on your contract. There are also hidden fees. They're cheaper than you’ll find with competing cable TV and satellite TV providers, but still kind of a pain. In addition to $12 local broadcast fee, you’ll be charged extra if you want the latest and greatest Hopper DVR or Joey set-top boxes for additional rooms.

There's another extra fee you might be charged, but we think it's worth it if you travel often! It's called DISH Outdoors, and for just $5 (after equipment rental), you can watch live TV from anywhere, no internet required. There are several antenna styles to choose from, and we think the service is a great option for camping, tailgating, or traveling the country in an RV.

If you’re passionate about catching all your favorite TV anytime, anywhere, and willing to pay for truly exceptional picture quality, DISH is a fantastic option.

Editor's choice
DISH
DISH
Staff rating
4.0
Customer rating
3.9
  • Plans starting at $56.99 - $137.99
  • 330+ channels
  • 125-500 DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply. For offer details, view disclaimers

Find TV providers in your area.

Runners-up

#2 Optimum: A massive channel line-up and a sweet $500 contract buyout, but high-speed internet is required

Optimum TV has an excellent cable TV offering at low prices, and we love that it will buy switchers out of their current contract without requiring them to sign a new one. Its biggest strength—the fact that it uses high-speed internet to serve up its hundreds of channels—is also its biggest weakness. The only way to qualify for Optimum TV is to pay for its internet service, and paying for both brings the TV service about level with other satellite TV and cable TV providers. To qualify for TV service, you need internet speeds of at least 20 Mbps.

But oh, is it good TV if you can get it! With the top-tier package, you get access to more than 420 channels, including all the most popular options. There’s also a solid sports and entertainment lineup. The extra fees aren’t fun, but they’re about in line with the competition.

There is a big downside when it comes to cost with Optimum, however. Prices go up between $85 and $115 in the second year of service. That's a shocking increase, and not affordable for a lot of households. Since there are no contracts, we recommend setting yourself a reminder to shop for a competing internet service a year after you sign up.

There's also the question of availability. Optimum by Altice is in 21 states, serving about 6.5% of US households. Its fiber internet offering, though, is available to just 1.3% of households. (1) That means most people in its service area will get DSL internet instead of fiber. Our top pick, in comparison, is available virtually anywhere you can mount a dish with a clear view of the southern sky.

Runner-up
Optimum
Optimum brand
Staff rating
4.0
Customer rating
3.7
  • Plans starting at $2.15 - $195.00
  • 420+ channels
  • 150 DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply. For offer details, view disclaimers

#3 Verizon Fios: Ultra-reliable TV with unlimited streaming and a nifty package option

Fiber-powered live TV has emerged as one of the best formats on the market, and Verizon Fios tops the charts. Fios is one of our top internet providers, and its TV service is neck and neck with top cable and satellite TV offerings. The best part, though, is the unique package offering. You can pay for the lowest or highest tier out of the gate, or you can watch free for 60 days and Verizon will customize a list of channels it thinks will serve you best. It’s called Fios TV Test Drive, and it’s one of the best ways we found to pay for what you actually watch.

While there’s a lot to love about Verizon Fios TV, its equipment setup is a little lacking. But that’s because Verizon really wants you to use the supercharged (and highly rated) app. You can use it with streaming sticks or the smart TV you already own to stream truly unlimited content, from anywhere. It’s one of the best companion streaming apps we found, and it works with virtually any equipment you already have.

The DVR is a solid machine, and can record up to 12 shows at a time. You can also control it all with your phone, which is pretty cool, but you’ll have to pay for cloud DVR storage every month.

If you don't want internet with your TV from Verizon Fios, you may also be charged a $15 monthly modem fee. Since you can get internet without equipment fees for as low as $25 per month, we recommend just getting the whole package. Last we checked, Verizon Fios internet is available to 34.8 million people, mostly in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. (2)

Runner-up
Verizon Fios
Verizon Fios brand
Staff rating
4.2
Customer rating
4.3
  • Plans starting at $49.99 - $110.00
  • 425+ channels
  • 50+ DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply.

#4 Xfinity TV: A classic cable experience (including a contract and pesky fees)

Xfinity is one of the most widely available TV services in the US, available to nearly 108 million people across 48 states. Its costs and channel lineup are better than most, and there are plans that don't require contracts.

The cable giant’s reputation for customer service has made huge strides in recent years, and we applaud the improvement. It still suffers from that bad reputation, though, and we're still hearing about billing disputes. However, the company has earned a score of 67 out of a hundred by the American Customer Satisfaction Index, and that's an improvement over just a year ago. The score was still lower than those earned by Verizon Fios and AT&T Internet, but the trajectory is good! (3)

With Xfinity TV, you can count on dependable TV, all the top channels and sports, and stable package pricing if you choose a plan with a 12-month contract.

It’s a nice offering and the DVR is top-shelf, but there’s a big caveat: mandatory fees inflate those package prices by $30 or more. You have to pay for the DVR, plus an additional fee to access the DVR. Even worse, you pay both a regional sports fee and a local broadcast fee. Yuck.

Xfinity also offers both cable and fiber internet service, plus mobile phone service. You may be able to save by bundling services or negotiating a deal over the phone.

Xfinity can’t compete with top satellite and fiber TV providers on picture quality, but it’s a tried-and-true cable TV option for millions of households.

Runner-up
Xfinity
Xfinity brand
Staff rating
3.8
Customer rating
4.2
  • Plans starting at $19.99 - $299.95
  • 10+ channels
  • 20+ DVR storage hours

Offer details: Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply. For offer details, visit the provider's website.

Our experts get that our top overall TV providers may not fit your personal criteria for what makes a TV subscription worth the cost. We juggled our ranking criteria based on a few different metrics to help you understand all the top options.

Best cheap TV providers

Want to save money on TV? Here are our top recommendations:

Read our full article on the best cheap TV providers. Or, if you want to save even more, learn how to get TV for free.

Top ten TV providers

Our top TV providers are excellent choices when it comes to channel lineup, price, and the complete customer experience. But each has a unique offering, unique bundling options, and packages catered to a specific audience. That’s why our experts compared all the biggest providers out there, head to head. Browse our top ten list for the full rundown.

Brand nameStarsDownload speedPricingView plans
1. DISH4.0 / 5n/a$56.99 - $137.99
View plans
2. Optimum4.0 / 5100 Mbps - 940 Mbps$2.15 - $195.00
View plans
3. Verizon Fios4.2 / 5300 Mbps - 940 Mbps$49.99 - $110.00
View plans
4. Xfinity3.8 / 525 Mbps - 6000 Mbps$19.99 - $299.95
View plans
5. DIRECTV3.7 / 5n/a$48.99 - $149.99
View plans
6. Astound Broadband3.7 / 5110 Mbps - 1200 Mbps$19.99 - $135.89
View plans
7. Cox Communications3.3 / 5100 Mbps - 2 Gbps$0.00 - $205.00
View plans
8. WOW!3.6 / 550 Mbps - 1200 Mbps$9.99 - $199.98
View plans
9. Mediacom3.4 / 55 Mbps - 1000 Mbps$19.99 - $139.99
View plans
10. Spectrum3.3 / 530 Mbps - 1 Gbps$19.99 - $169.97
View plans
Availability and pricing are subject to location. Conditions apply.

Compare TV providers

Choosing a TV provider can be tricky, but we have you covered! Use our direct comparison tool to see pricing, read expert reviews, and find out what real users think.

Start by comparing our top-rated TV providers, or by choosing from popular side-by-sides below. Add or remove brands in a few clicks to find exactly what you need.

How to choose a new TV provider

The first step in switching TV providers is to think about how you watch. You can start with a list of your favorite shows, for example, or you might already know which channels you want most. Sports are another big reason to pay for live TV, so ask everyone in your household if there are games or leagues they can’t live without. Think about the importance of watching in real-time, too, compared to watching on your schedule.

When you have a list in mind, find out what’s available in your area. Many cable TV companies have local monopolies, so you may have only a handful of options. There are a few things to keep in mind as you browse TV package options:

  • There can be big differences in price and channel availability based on location, so you may have to enter your address or ZIP code to see what’s on offer near you.
  • You will probably have to sign up for a bunch of channels you don’t want to get to the few you do.
  • Extra fees are very, very common.
  • "Free" access to premium channels usually expires after a few months, after which you’ll be charged the full price.

Once you have an idea of available packages, we recommend reading reviews and talking to your neighbors to find out about their experiences. When you’ve decided, we usually recommend calling the provider to order—it’s a good way to get extra perks. Online ordering is another popular option, and some providers waive installation fees if you go that route.

TV tech types

The technology behind how your home gets TV can have a big impact on picture quality, reliability, and cost. You probably won’t have much of a choice on which tech is available in your neighborhood, but it’s nice to know the landscape as you decide what’s right for you.

  • Broadcast TV: This is the oldest type of TV, and it works over the air. Substations send signals out over a wide area, and antennas connected to TV sets unscramble the signal into video. In most areas, the four local broadcast channels are ABC, NBC, CBS, and FOX. You may also get local educational channels such as PBS. The best part of broadcast television is that it’s free and suitable for a wide audience. The downside? You need an antenna if you don’t have a TV subscription. You can find a decent digital antenna to watch in HD for about $20, and some TVs come with a built-in antenna. Find out how to get TV for free.
  • Cable TV: This widely available TV tech type uses a series of coaxial cables both outside and inside your house. Cable companies provide set-top boxes that unscramble the data for your TV. Most cable providers also provide on-demand content to watch anytime and DVR tech so you can skip commercials and record programs to watch later. The upside of cable is dozens or even hundreds of channels to choose from, but the downsides are monthly costs and contracts plus (sometimes significant) extra fees.
  • Satellite TV: This TV type is available anywhere you can mount a dish with a clear view of the southern sky. It works by beaming data from a satellite dish orbiting space to the receiver dish at your house. Like with cable, you’ll need a set-top box to unscramble the data, and you’ll need to deal with contracts, monthly fees, and hidden fees. You’ll get access to hundreds of channels, though, and picture quality is among the best available. Learn about satellite vs. cable TV.
  • Streaming live TV: This TV tech uses digital signals sent over the internet to provide live TV service. As long as you have internet access and a device that can handle the provider’s app, you’re good to go.

TV providers and contracts: what you need to know

Some legacy cable TV providers and both major satellite providers require you to sign contracts when you sign up for service. These usually range from 12–36 months. If you want to get out early, you will be charged cancellation fees (also known as early termination fees or ETFs). Usually, they start at about $10 for each month remaining in your contract. Some providers even hike monthly prices in year two, without letting you out of your obligation to pay. It’s not awesome.

Contracts aren’t all bad, though. They let providers roll the costs of installation into the monthly price, so you don’t have to pay a lot at the beginning. Contracts sometimes also come with price locks, so you won’t have to worry about your bill going up for a few years. Whether you’re approaching a second-year price hike or nearing the end of your three-year rate lock, we think it’s worth it to call customer service and try to negotiate a new deal. It’ll take a little patience and a little time, but the monthly savings could really add up.

Another good thing about contracts? With the growing popularity of streaming services and internet live TV, they’re starting to fade away. However, they’re still something to be aware of before you switch to a new service. Each of our TV service reviews gives you what you need to know about contracts under the pricing tab.

The national stampede toward live TV streaming services

Streaming video has been around since the early days of the internet, and more and more households are canceling linear cable and satellite TV subscriptions entirely. According to the Liechtman Research Group (LRG), the biggest cable providers lost nearly 1 million of their combined 38.6 million subscribers in just three months in 2022. Of the remaining customers,more than 8 million already get TV delivered over the internet. (4)

If you’re thinking about joining the cord cutters, you have a huge variety of options.

You can pay for a streaming service with an existing TV provider. You’ll get access to a lot of the same content and may still be able to use cloud DVR services, but you’ll need a separate subscription for broadband internet. DIRECTV STREAM is one of the top offerings in this space, and our pick for streaming services for news junkies. Sling TV, which is the current iteration of the streaming offering from DISH, is our #1 cheap streaming service that offers live TV.

Another popular option is to pay for internet from one provider and choose a separate live streaming service, such as YouTube TV, Sling TV, or Hulu + Live TV. Using your existing internet connection, you’ll find many of the same channel lineups and premium services as with regular cable TV. You may have to bring your own streaming device, but free trials are very common.

The last option worth mentioning is on-demand streaming services like Netflix, Prime Video, Paramount+ and Disney+. These services store a library of content you can watch anytime, anywhere you have access to a streaming device and broadband internet service. Some, like Paramount’s Pluto TV and Amazon’s Freevee, are supported by ads rather than subscriptions. Often, people sign up for multiple on-demand streaming services in addition to a live TV service.

Interested in reading the legacy TV providers behind? Read our complete guide to cutting the cord.

Understanding channel lineups and premium add-ons

Wait, you hand over a fat stack of Hamiltons every month for live TV service, but you’re still locked out of the best channels? It’s often true, and it’s one of the worst things about linear TV in 2023. Here’s how it works:

Basic cable

This is the channel lineup you get with most providers’ lowest-tier TV package. It generally includes your local broadcast networks plus popular options like Comedy Central, Fox News, MSNBC, Food Network, and HGTV.

Broadcast channels

These are the free channels you get over the air, and include local channels like ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, and FOX. You can get them for free with a digital antenna, but will likely be charged a local broadcast fee to get them as part of your cable or satellite TV service.

Premium entertainment

Some of the best movies and hottest shows are available only by paying an extra $10–$20 per month on top of your TV subscription. Some of the most popular add-ons include HBO, EPIX, and STARZ. Depending on the add-on, you may get access to just one channel, multiple channels featuring similar content, or bonus on-demand content.

Sports

Some popular local sports are available on broadcast or basic cable channels, but watching almost any specialty sport or the best out-of-town games requires sports add-ons. These are available at the league level, with packages like NFL SUNDAY TICKET or MLB EXTRA INNINGS. You can also pay extra for college, international, and league coverage.

The in and outs of DVRs in 2023

Once upon a time, recording live TV was a revelation! People dedicated entire storage rooms to VHS tapes of their favorite shows. Then, along came digital video recording (DVR) machines that automatically recorded shows at the press of a button.

Fast forward to 2023 (see what we did there?), and watching your favorite shows as they air is even less compelling. Some households still love their DVRs, top-of-the-line set-top DVRs let you record up to 16 shows at once, save thousands of shows to watch later, and watch DVR content from anywhere. You’ll usually pay a DVR rental fee and potentially a DVR access fee with this type of system.

The benefits of cloud DVR

Other providers, especially those that offer streaming live TV services, rely on cloud DVR. It does all the same things you’d expect from a physical DVR, but you need broadband internet and a streaming device to watch. Cloud DVR fees are common, and you may need a streaming stick or smart TV with storage capability.

If you haven’t thought of DVRs since the final season of Lost aired during that fateful February in 2010, we get you. Many people rely on streaming services these days, and we expect physical DVRs to soon go the way of the VHS storage rooms that came before.

Learn how much DVR storage you need.

TV subscription service fees

If you’re new to paying for live TV, you might be shocked by your first bill. The real price you must pay each month can be a lot higher than advertised prices. Every provider does billing a little differently, but these extra fees can be found on almost every bill:

  • An equipment fee
  • A broadcast fee
  • A regional sports fee
  • Local taxes and fees
  • Administrative costs

Learn how to read your TV bill (and find ways to save).

Still hungry for more live TV know-how?

Our expert team does more than just review providers. They’ve written the book on everything you need to know about TV service. We also have some great info on switching internet providers.

How we ranked TV providers in 2023

Our biggest priority is to help you feel confident about deciding whether it’s time to switch providers. We do the heavy lifting, provide accurate and up-to-date info, and give you the context you need to make sense of it all. We’re on your side in this journey, and our ranking system for TV providers reflects our commitment to customer advocacy.

To earn your trust, we had to understand your perspective. That’s why we started by talking with folks from all walks of life who had switched TV providers in the last 12 months. We also sent out surveys and sourced reviews from verified customers in our attempt and found out the following:

  • What switchers really care about
  • How switchers make decisions about TV providers
  • What problems switchers face along the way

We compiled what we learned to create a (hopefully) fair way to judge all TV providers, regardless of their footprint. We want to recognize the companies out there providing the best viewing experiences to their customers, and our star rankings reflect that.

With our ranking criteria in hand, our experts went right to the source for each provider. We looked beyond ads and resellers to find out what’s available to real people. Here’s a sampling of our efforts:

  • Hours of research on provider websites
  • Discussions with chat bots
  • Deep dives on help documentation
  • Real shopping cart experience
  • When possible, live testing of services and the equipment

Along the way, we kept talking to real people. We read customer reviews from the internet, we browsed frequently asked questions, and added it all to our decades of combined experience to put it all in perspective.

Value

Our experts looked at what you get for the money with each TV provider. We compared all the package lineups and pricing tiers to find out how many channels you get for your dollar. Having a lot of options is important, but we didn’t stop there.

Next, we examined channel lineups and compared them against America’s favorite channels to find out whether you can get what you want with providers in your area. (5) We also kept an eye out for what some of our reviewers called “filler channels,” such as music and shopping channels. These can artificially inflate channel counts without adding much value, and we didn’t want to lead you astray.

Once the data was in, we recommended the best TV providers, the packages we liked most, and the packages we don’t think are worth it for most people. We also looked at ways you can save by bundling services, all to help you find a good fit.

Features

For this category, we thought about what makes a TV experience unique. We dug up DVR offerings and looked at the bells and whistles of remotes and set-top boxes from each provider. Voice remotes got a lot of love, but set-top boxes without built-in DVR or updated tech earned a ding.

We also researched mobile apps from each provider, and tried them out ourselves when we could. We found out what was good, what was only OK, and what was a waste of storage space on your smartphone or streaming stick.

Equipment and installation

Getting set up with a new provider can be a real hassle, so we looked at everything you need to know before you decide to make a change. We found out how much installation costs, whether you can do it yourself (and save money in the process), and how long it takes. We also looked into the different kinds of equipment you need for different TV tech and what it takes to return it all if you’re not satisfied.

Next, we compared compatibility with streaming sticks and home entertainment systems, such as that sweet Sony Soundbar or the Bose Surround system you sprung for last year. Finding a TV service that’s right for you means finding one that works with your gear, without a lot of hassle or confusion.

Sports and premium channels

What’s live TV without the sports and movies you crave? Our research confirmed our assumption that these are among the top reasons to subscribe to TV service. We looked at the availability of regional and national sports, movies, and shows that fit your unique needs, whether that’s foreign language films, loads of home improvement content, or news and education from around the world.

To help you understand your options, we looked at what you can get in basic packages compared to what requires pricey add-ons. We gave the highest scores to providers that included premium options in regular pricing, and we applauded providers that make it easy to pay only for what you want to watch. We also called out promotional deals on premium channels, and noted that these deals can feel like hidden fees a few months down the line if you forget to cancel.

Availability

Our star rankings reflect our research-based findings on the best TV providers doing business today, even if those providers don’t serve a lot of households. At the same time, we recognize it’s not always helpful to highlight cable TV providers that are impossible for most people to get. For that reason, we rejiggered our ranking formula to give more weight to availability in our “best of” series. We also used availability as a tiebreaker in our star rankings, because a service that’s easy to get offers more value than one that makes big promises, but just can’t deliver.

A little affiliate marketing transparency

Our primary goal is to be helpful as you decide which TV service is right for you—even if you decide it’s time to cut the cord and stick with streaming apps instead of linear TV. But we still need to pay our folks and keep the lights on. To that end, the Switchful business team has struck deals with some of the providers we review to pay us a small fee if you purchase their service after visiting our website.

Our experts on the editorial side don’t know which providers pay us and which don’t. Furthermore, we’ll never recommend a bad service to make a buck, and we won’t hold back our praise for a provider just because there’s no business relationship there. We know how important objectivity is in affiliate marketing, and we’re here to get it right.

That means knowing what you care about, doing the heavy lifting on research, and putting you at ease as we explain our recommendations. You’re in the driver’s seat, and we’re here for navigation, insight…and maybe even a little carpool karaoke.

(1) "FCC National Broadband Map—Altice," FCC. Accessed 20 December 2022.

(2) "Verizon Fios Availability Map," Broadband Now. Accessed 20 December 2022.

(3) "Satisfaction Benchmarks by Company, Internet Service Providers," ACSI. Accessed 20 December 2022.

(4) "Major Pay-TV Providers Lost About 785,000 Subscribers in 3Q 2022," Leichtman Research Group. Accessed 20 December 2022.

(5) "Most-Watched Television Networks: Ranking 2021’s Winners and Losers," Variety. Accessed 20 December 2022.

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The people behind our research
We believe the best information comes from first-hand customer experience and methodical research by subject-matter experts. We never source information from "content farms," and we don’t generate content using artificial intelligence (AI). You can trust that our recommendations are fact-checked meticulously and sourced appropriately by authentic, industry-recognized people.
Contributing researchers
Headshot of Kathryn Casna
Researched by
Kathryn CasnaSenior Staff Writer

Kathryn is a consumer advocate writer who helps people quickly and easily find the best products and services for their needs. Over the last decade, she's helped people navigate everything from Internet companies to Medicare plans to business software. When she's not geeking out about saving her readers time and money, you'll find her climbing the rocks of Utah—or asleep in her favorite hammock.

Rebecca Palmer smiles for the camera
Researched by
Rebecca PalmerSenior Staff Writer

Rebecca Palmer has been writing about tech and consumer finance since 2010. Her work has been featured in the Deseret News, Idaho Business Review, TopTenReviews.com, and more. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, and lives in Salt Lake City with her exceptionally delightful pup, Nymeria.

Contributing reviewers
Headshot of Vilja Johnson
Reviewed by
Vilja JohnsonVice President, Content and Creative

Vilja Johnson leads Switchful's editorial and creative teams. She has been editing content in the consumer tech space since 2016, and she has over a decade of experience teaching writing and editing. She's passionate about creating content that resonates with people and helps them solve real, day-to-day problems. In her free time, Vilja serves on the board of directors for the PrisonEd Foundation, where she runs a writing program for inmates in Utah prisons and jails.

Headshot of Bri Field
Reviewed by
Bri FieldAssigning Editor

Bri Field has a background in academia, research writing, and brand marketing. She has edited scientific publications, conference papers, digital content, and technical communications. As Assigning Editor, she enjoys ensuring all content is accurate, clear, and helpful. In her free time, you can find her in the kitchen trying a new recipe, out on a hike, or working through her massive TBR list.